Steve Arnold, a renowned meteorite hunter, came to York County on Wednesday in search of the meteorite that is believed to have flashed across the sky early Monday.
Astrophotographer Mike Hankey of Freeland, Md., captured Monday s meteor streaking through the frame of his camera mounted to a 90mm scope atop his
Astrophotographer Mike Hankey of Freeland, Md., captured Monday s meteor streaking through the frame of his camera mounted to a 90mm scope atop his telescope. He was shooting at an ISO of 800 with a three-minute exposure. (COURTESY OF MIKE HANKEY )

On Thursday, Arnold visited novice astrophotographer Mike Hankey of Freeland, Md., to view photos he captured of the fireball.

Hankey didn't totally capture the Andromeda Galaxy - his intended target - but "I hit the jackpot on the meteor," he said.

His photos show at least six fragments from the meteor, Arnold said. Chances are, it broke into even more pieces, and multiple pieces are good.

Arnold will continue to look for more surveillance videos - in addition to the York Water Co.'s footage - to help figure out where the strewn field might be. If need be, he'll knock on doors of companies that have security cameras.

"At this stage, it's east of (Interstate) 83 and north of the (Maryland) border," Arnold said of where he believes the meteorite remnants could be.



METEORITE MAN

Steve Arnold is a co-star on the Science Channel show "Meteorite Men." He is billed as "the world's most famous meteorite hunter."

He has come to the area in search of rock from the meteor seen in the York County sky early Monday.

Eyewitness accounts and reports of a sonic boom have Arnold believing meteorite fragments are in the area.

"Sometimes it ends up being a wild goose chase," Arnold said. "You can't get lucky unless you work hard, too.

Meteorite hunter Steve Arnold, with his record find -- a 1,400-pound oriented pallasite meteorite discovered in Kansas in 2005.
Meteorite hunter Steve Arnold, with his record find -- a 1,400-pound oriented pallasite meteorite discovered in Kansas in 2005. (COURTESY OF STEVEARNOLDMETEORITES.COM)
"

His hunches have paid off before. The 1,430-pound oriented pallasite meteorite he found in Kansas in 2005 is the largest known of its kind. Only about 1 percent of all meteorites are pallasite, which consists of translucent crystals packed in nickel and iron. "Oriented" means the meteorite did not break up or spin out of shape as it entered the atmosphere.



METEORITE FACTS


-- Some meteoroids enter the atmosphere at approximately 130,000 miles per hour.


-- Meteorites contain the oldest known rocks in the solar system and pre-solar minerals that formed around other stars possibly billions of years before our solar system formed.

Another York meteor: In 1907, a farmer plowing a field north of Shrewsbury found a meteorite that was 6 inches wide and a hefty 24 pounds, according to the
Another York meteor: In 1907, a farmer plowing a field north of Shrewsbury found a meteorite that was 6 inches wide and a hefty 24 pounds, according to the Carnegie-Mellon Web site. Known as The Shrewsbury, it was later sliced up and distributed to several museums. (SUBMITTED)


-- The International Space Station is covered with a foot-thick blanket of Kevlar, to protect it from the estimated 100,000 meteoroids that will slam into it during its expected 20-year life span.


-- Each day, up to 4 billion meteoroids fall to Earth. Most of them are minuscule in size.


-- If you find a meteorite, you are expected to donate 20 percent or 20 grams, whichever is smaller, to a laboratory for future research. You can keep or sell the rest.


-- The largest meteorite ever found weighed about 66 tons.


-- Of the 24,000 or so meteorites that have been discovered on Earth, about 34 have been identified as originating from Mars.


-- The most brilliant meteor shower took place on Nov. 12-13, 1833. It was one of the Leonid showers, which occur every November and seem to come from the direction of the constellation Leo.



GLOSSARY


A meteor is the bright streak of light seen trailing a meteoroid. They are also known as shooting stars.


A meteoroid is any interplanetary object larger than a speck of dust and smaller than an asteroid.


A meteorite is what a meteoroid becomes when it falls to Earth.


A meteor shower occurs when a number of tiny meteoroids enter Earth's atmosphere at extremely high speeds.


An asteroid is any of numerous small planetary bodies that revolve around the sun. Asteroids are also called minor planets or planetoids. Most are in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.


A comet is an icy body that releases gas or dust. A comet consists of a solid nucleus surrounded by a cloudy atmosphere called the coma and one or two tails.




Sources: NASA.gov; discovermagazine.com; worldrecordmeteorite.com