William Tecumseh Sherman was the superintendent of the Louisiana State Seminary and Military Academy (It later became LSU) before the Civil War.
William Tecumseh Sherman was the superintendent of the Louisiana State Seminary and Military Academy (It later became LSU) before the Civil War. (File Photo)
To many Northern college football fans, LSU is one of the most intriguing, even somewhat mysterious and powerful, outposts of the game.

Lots of Southern pageantry and success mixed in with Cajun seasoning for good measure.

A different world, so to speak.

But what do we really know about LSU?

Of course, it has plenty of academic-related accomplishments to be proud of, like most big institutions.

There are the highly acclaimed landscape architecture and ceramics programs. There is the valiant work by its veterinary medical association shelter that cared for more than 500 animals after Hurricane Katrina.

It also features "the premier internal audit program in the world," if that kind of thing gets you going.

And if you're looking for the nation's largest animation festival dedicated to economic and community development? Well, look no further.

But we still need a face for the place.

We could consider sports stars like Pistol Pete Maravich or Shaquille O'Neal, who played there. Maybe a little old-school music icon alum like Stephen Stills.

Maybe even a big-screen star like Joanne Woodward.

But how about we go a little dicey?

Let's start with William Tecumseh Sherman, the Union Army leader who led the famous/infamous March to the Sea that basically destroyed Georgia and ended the Civil War. He could very well still be one of the most hated men in the South.


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Sherman, ironically, was the superintendent of the Louisiana State Seminary and Military Academy (It later became LSU) before the war.

Then, let's move on next to James Carville, who certainly produces some strong feelings of his own.

Carville attended LSU and is regarded as one of its most visible fans. And as a political consultant and commentator, he's often given credit for helping Bill Clinton earn a presidential election in 1992.

He also probably hits a nerve with some Penn State fans.

Remember, he's the guy who uttered that lovely description of Pennsylvania, almost surely with a confident smile on his face.

The one about how the state really is just "Philadelphia and Pittsburgh with Alabama in between."
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